Weekly Update

Hello! I hope that this will find each of you well and hopefully doing your social distancing. I have been spending more time looking at old mill sites, which makes social distancing relatively easy. But first... Thanks to those of you who provided some answers to last week's question regarding Johnny's Cider Mill. We have a few clues, but still no definitive date. If you think you can help, please let me know. This week I will take a look at one of the best, if not the best, preserved colonial mill sites in Easton. I will do part one today and part two next week. Take a trip with me down the Beaver Brook to dear old Furnace Village. The Beaver Brook flows under Foundry Street, and j

Weekly Update

Hello from a snowy Easton! Yes, snow! This morning we had about 2-3 inches of heavy, wet snow, which brought welcome relief for a number of children who have been stuck at home. I am sure a few people made snowmen and did some sledding to break up the boredom of these recent weeks. Before I go any further, I have a question for you: Does anyone remember specifically what year Johnny's Cider Mill ceased operation? We have a nice article written in the 1970's about the mill, which was an Easton landmark for so many years, but there is some confusion as to when it actually closed. As sure answer would be welcomed! Today I continue to look at the remains of mills in the Poquanticut region of

Weekly Update

Greetings fellow historians! I want to start my update today by recognizing the many people who are doing all they can to help us through this pandemic. I hope you will join me in sending thoughts and prayers to these modern day heroes who daily risk their own health and welfare to help those who need help: Our first responders of all services, medical professionals of all kinds - doctors, nurses, physicians assistants, lab workers, specimen collectors, technologists, health care administrators, security, Federal, State, and Local health officials, visiting nurses and therapists, and so may more. And let's remember those whose research will lead to safe vaccines, and treatments and medici

Weekly Update

Hello from a very rain-soaked Easton! I certainly hope this finds each of you well during this difficult, and stressful, time. A number of you remarked about last week's message regarding the former mill site off Rockland Street. Today I will provide just a few more photos for you. The dam at the Buck Pond mill site, which I spoke of last week, is of a much coarser construction than those that were built following the Civil War. These later dams tended to have a straighter wall and the nicely cut stones formed a vertical wall rather than a sloped wall. Although it is hard to see from the attached photos, I think you might agree to the earlier date of this particular dam. The dam itself

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